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Asphalt or Concrete: Choosing the Best Surface For Your Parking Lot

Asphalt or Concrete: Choosing the Best Surface For Your Parking Lot

Asphalt or Concrete: Choosing the Best Surface For your parking Lot

Both asphalt and concrete make for great parking lots, roads, and driveways. One material is not necessarily better than the other, it just boils down to the type of use, budget, and ongoing maintenance. Ultimately, it is up to what will work best for your project. Answer these questions below to determine which material is best for you.

Amount of Usage

What type of vehicles will be used on this surface, and how many vehicles will be using this on a regular basis?

The number of vehicles and weight can make a huge difference in what type of material to use. If you are looking to use your surface as a loading dock or for heavy vehicles to rest on for long periods of time, concrete may be the better option for you. While asphalt is durable, it can become flexible under heavy loads, which can, in turn, create indentations in the surface as heavyweights can be too much. Asphalt is typically the better option for parking lots and roads that have lower volumes of traffic. 

Total Cost

What’s your budget?  

Concrete will generally cost more than asphalt as the installation is more expensive. Asphalt is faster to install and can be used the same day that it is laid. These factors lend to a less expensive cost, but one must also consider maintenance costs.  

Maintenance

How often do you want to maintain your surface?

Ongoing maintenance is needed for both asphalt and concrete. However, asphalt requires more ongoing maintenance as it should be resealed every 3-6 years. While asphalt may require more maintenance, it is typically less expensive than concrete repair. With concrete repairs, one must replace an entire slab as opposed to just patching cracks or holes. 

Pavement Lifecycle

How long do you want your pavement to last?

Each surface will last a long time provided routine maintenance is done. A concrete driveway for example can last from about 30-40 years while an asphalt driveway can last 20-30 years. While a concrete driveway has a longer lifespan, it will be more expensive to replace than the asphalt. 

Weather

Do you live in a warm or cool climate? 

If you live in an area with a warmer climate, you might want to consider choosing a surface that accounts for this. Asphalt retains heat more than concrete, so asphalt surfaces can get hotter than concrete. Concrete does not absorb as much UV radiation and can be easier to walk on in the heat compared to asphalt. Another thing to consider is living in a cooler climate. If it snows a lot, it is good to know that concrete cannot have salt on it or it will be damaged. In general, concrete does not perform as well in cold weather as it can be subject to cracking from the cold. Since asphalt is able to absorb more heat from the sun, it allows snow to melt faster on its surface. Both surfaces react differently to weather conditions, so it is important to consider your climate before making a decision.

Appeal

What do you want your surface to look like? 

Some people tend to prefer concrete as it can be colored to change the look while asphalt does not have that ability. While this is the case, it is important to note that oil stains are much more noticeable on concrete than asphalt.

Site of Project

Does the parking lot, road, and or driveway have the proper drainage and slope?

Whether concrete or asphalt, one must consider the amount of slope and drainage your project has. If water is able to collect and pool, this can damage the surface. Certain types of asphalt can help with water drainage, which can not only benefit you but also help the environment.

Now that you have read through the different factors to consider, which do you prefer: asphalt or concrete? Whichever pavement you choose, Byrne & Jones Construction is ready to help. Contact us now for a free consultation at (314) 254-9766.

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What is the best track surface for High Schools?

What is the best track surface for High Schools?

What is the best track surface for high schools?

So it’s time to choose a track surface – which route should you go? The good news is there are only a handful of standard track surfacing systems offered, and only two that are standard for high schools: Polyurethane Black Mat and Structural Spray systems, and then Latex Systems. Then, the two most important factors that come into play when deciding on one of these track surfaces are durability and cost.

Historically, latex systems were a common first-step when schools were moving from a cinder or gravel track to an all-weather track due to Latex’s slightly lower initial installation cost (compared to polyurethane). In recent years, a higher percentage of schools are installing polyurethane as their first system, or removing their existing latex systems to install a polyurethane system. This shift is due to less frequently-needed resurfacings and the longer total life of the polyurethane system.

Latex Running Track Systems

Latex tracks are installed by broadcasting rubber onto the asphalt base, and then coating it with a liquid latex binder. This is performed in multiple lifts and most latex tracks will have two to eight lifts. Naturally, an eight-lift system will last you much longer between resurfacings than a two-lift system, and the frequency of resurfacing can be simply calculated by: number of lifts = number of years between resurfacings. A two-lift latex system should have another top layer installed after two years, and an eight-lift system should have a new top coat put on after eight years. Many latex systems are sold as 7 to 10-year systems regardless of how many lifts are being installed. Make sure you speak with your track provider and are aware of how many lifts are being installed prior to signing on the dotted line.

The most common issue with latex systems is that no matter how many lifts are initially installed, the top layer will shed and harden due to use and UV damage from the sun. As the sun hardens the top layer, and athletes and walkers use the track, the top layer begins to shear off. If you have seen a track like (picture of a worn latex track), then you can be certain that the owner of that track was not able to or did not properly follow resurfacing guidelines. Even if the track surfacing may not be fully worn into the asphalt, the top layer hardens with age and becomes harsher on the athlete’s muscles and joints.

Polyurethane Base Mat and Structural Spray Systems (BM&SS)

Most high schools today are installing a Base Mat and Structural Spray (BM&SS) Polyurethane System. There are higher-level, more expensive polyurethane systems that can commonly be found at the collegiate level, but if you are looking for high-quality that won’t break the bank, the BM&SS hits the sweet spot.

Unlike Latex systems that are installed in lifts of rubber-binder-rubber-binder, BM&SS systems mix the rubber and polyurethane prior to installation onto the track asphalt. This allows for a more durable bond and longer-lasting surface.

The base mat is installed with a paver similar to an asphalt paver – but this paver was built specifically for running tracks. A black base mat alone without a structural spray would wear like a mid-range latex track. What makes these systems stand well above their counterpart is the structural spray component.

The Structural Spray is composed of a finer rubber than is in the black base mat, and much higher percentage of liquid polyurethane. The spray is installed with two passes – once clockwise around the track, and the other counter-clockwise (along with once in each direction for field event runways). The purpose of this spray is to protect the black base mat, which is the true cushion and performance layer of the track. A latex system has no top protection, so as it wears, the system begins to oxidize, thin out and harden. The structural spray on a poly system acts like a sunscreen protecting the black mat from the UV degradation of the sun allowing and maintaining the integrity of your black base mat for the life of your track.

The Structural Spray brings three main benefits to the system above the standard latex systems:

1) UV Protection – By providing a UV-protected layer over the base mat, the sun cannot damage the base mat.

2) Use Protection – As athletes and the community uses the running track, the spray will slowly wear over time while maintaining the integrity of the black base mat. Your black base mat will not lose thickness, over time, if new structural sprays are applied accordingly (Appx. every 8 years)

3) Durability – Due to the finer rubber and higher liquid content, the spray seeps into the top layer of the base mat and “locks” the system together. This helps prevent against the cracking commonly seem in latex tracks.

If you have a running track that is in need of attention, or simply have questions regarding the types of track systems that are out there, please do not hesitate to call us at (314) 254-9766.

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5730 Hayden Run Rd
Hilliard, OH 43026
(614) 662-4572
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2323 Kearbey Lane South
Roxana, IL 62087
(618) 221-5578
bdobbs@byrneandjones.com

Ohio Office

5730 Hayden Run Rd
Hilliard, OH 43026
(614) 662-4572
ben@byrneandjones.com

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What Are The Types of Infill That Go Into an Artificial Turf Field?

What Are The Types of Infill That Go Into an Artificial Turf Field?

What are the types of infill that go into an artificial turf field?

The infill is the equivalent to the earth of a natural grass playing surface. The goal is to have the infill feel and perform like the “earth” of a natural grass field. The infill will determine how firm or fast a field plays, how the ball bounces and rolls, and it impacts how safe the fields are. The amount of infill needed is determined by how tall the fibers are, whether or not there is a shock pad being used, and the sport being played.

Infills typically fall into 5 categories. Each of these infills vary greatly, in both performance and cost.

  • Coated Sands
  • Coated SBR Rubber
  • Thermo Plastic Elastomers (TPE)
  • Virgin EPDM Rubber
  • Organic Infill

Understanding the different types of infill

The infill system is one of the most important aspects of all synthetic turf fields. It is the basis for the safety of the turf system by providing the appropriate cushioning to absorb impact. The infill provides the foundation to a field’s performance level by offering traction for players to cut, plant and release just like they would on natural grass.

Coated Sandsare made from uniformly sized natural sand and typically coated with acrylic, polyefin or an elastic coating.   These systems are usually a full depth infill system – not mixed with other mediums.  This infill does not require an irrigation system.  Shock pads are HIGHLY recommended if you are using a coated sand infill system. Most manufacturers require a shock pad, when using this infill.  Coated sand is subject to similar quality issues as TPE and as EPDM.  All three may clump over time.  Coated sand can add approximately $150,000 to $200,000 per field (this would include the cost of the shock pad.)  Coated sands are typically much cooler to the touch then SBR basic rubber system.  The maintenance of coated sand is similar to SBR systems; with a top dressing recommended in year five (5). 

Coated SBR Rubber – is very similar to the traditional SBR rubber infill. The SBR rubber product is typically coated with a virgin EPDM rubber. This system does not require an irrigation system. A shock pad is not required. However, if you are trying to pass a HIC Test a shock absorbing pad would be needed. Coated SBR can add approximately $40,000 per field. These infill systems are easy to maintain. The field will need to be top dressed every 5 years- at a cost of approximately $15,000.

Thermo Plastic Elastomers – (TPE) is similar in size to SBR rubber, but it is harder and typically rounder.  Thermo Plastic Elastomers are usually mixed with standard synthetic turf sands – to make up the infill system.  TPE comes in many colors and many variations for the aesthetics of a synthetic turf application.  Since TPE is a plastic, there is a risk over time of the TPE “melting” together.  This system does not require an irrigation system but will most likely require a shock pad. Some TPE manufactures claim their product can result in a 10 percent drop in temperature when used as an infill for artificial turf.  Maintenance of this system is very similar to the SBR systemsa top dressing is recommended every 5 years.

Virgin EPDM Rubberis rubber that has not been recycled. It is similar in size to SBR rubber. This is the most common infill system that is used in the artificial turf industry. Rubber is mixed with standard synthetic turf sands.  EPDM comes in many colors and many variations for the aesthetics of a synthetic turf application.  This system does not require an irrigation system A shock absorbing pad is recommended. Maintenance of this system is very similar to the SBR systems with a top dressing recommended after 5 years of play.

Organic InfillMost organic infill options are made from cork, walnut shells, coconut fiber, wood and or other similar products. 

Organic infills help produce the feel of natural grass, under foot. They make the fields play and perform more like natural grass too.  Because organic infills don’t conduct heat like the other infill systems, they are great at reducing field temperatures. Some organic infill systems claim they can reduce field temperatures up to 50-degrees.  

Most organic infilled systems will require an irrigation system. Water is necessary to keep the infill “hydrated”. This also assists with the temperature reduction.  Since most of the systems need water, as part of the recipe, the fields can be subject to freezing in the winter months.   

Because organic infills are very light weight, “floating” may occur. This can happen whenever there are heavy amounts of rain, in a short period of time, the infill will “float” or migriate to the sidelines. Shock pads are required when using organic infilled systems.  

This type of infill system can ad$120,000 to $400,000 to your project – depending on the infill, irrigation, and the shock pad selected.  

 

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Hilliard, OH 43026
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A Useful Plan For Your Parking Lot Repair

A Useful Plan For Your Parking Lot Repair

A useful plan for your parking lot repair

First impressions are lasting impressions. Does you parking lot make a good first impression? Landscaping, painting, lighting, and exterior building appearance says a lot about an owner’s commitment to continuous maintenance. The condition of your parking lots and roads do too. In order to keep your asphalt and concrete in pristine condition, it must be maintained on a regular basis. By having a paving maintenance plan in place, you can save yourself from costly repairs and safety issues down the road. 

What repairs are needed for a parking lot?

Parking lot repairs will vary depending on the amount of damage that is currently there. If there are cracks throughout your lot, those will need to be patched up. According to the Pavement Preservation & Recycling Alliance, 75% of unsealed cracks develop into potholes within 3 years while only 1% of sealed cracks develop into potholes in the same timeframe. Crack sealing may be the best option to fix those cracks. With this undertaking, we will go in and fill in those cracks to ensure that they do not expand any more. Crack sealing plays a significant role in extending the life of your pavement as it can add on 3-5 years.

After any cracks have been mended, we also recommend sealcoating your asphalt. Sealcoating will provide a protective layer to your pavement, helping to preserve it from harsh weather and UV rays, therefore extending the life of your lot. We recommend that you sealcoat your pavement every 3 years or whenever you start to notice the pavement turning to a grey color.

Midwest asphalt repair experts

At Byrne & Jones Construction, our job is to ensure that you are able to make a good first impression. With over 5 decades of pavement experience, we possess the horsepower to help you reach your project goals. Our office is filled with intelligent individuals who are construction and engineer-minded, all of whom are trained in all things asphalt and concrete. Our team regularly attends industry focused and educational events in order to keep up with new technology, pavement innovation, and maintenance solutions. We are committed to being the experts, so we strive to provide the best for you. 

In order to ensure that you are getting the best long lasting surface, the equipment and machinery used to install asphalt and concrete need to be well maintained and in good working order. With our newest state of the art equipment and new asphalt material plants in St. Louis and Nebraska, we can provide you with a superior finish. Byrne & Jones Construction has several pavers and crews to handle any size project. Big or small, we cover them all.

When you contact our pavement consultants, they will point you in the right direction – providing you with accurate, professional advice to help you establish a pavement plan. Our team will address the pavement surface condition and go deeper. We will explore what’s taking place below the surface as most pavement issues start within the foundation or base. An unstable base will lead to a lifetime of maintenance headaches.

If you are interested in making a good impression, saving money, and having a safe surface at your property, we want to talk to you. Call Byrne & Jones Construction at (314) 254-9766 and request to talk to one of our pavement consultants for your NO COST consultation.

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5730 Hayden Run Rd
Hilliard, OH 43026
(614) 662-4572
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Illinois Office

2323 Kearbey Lane South
Roxana, IL 62087
(618) 221-5578
bdobbs@byrneandjones.com

Ohio Office

5730 Hayden Run Rd
Hilliard, OH 43026
(614) 662-4572
ben@byrneandjones.com

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Sealcoating: How to Preserve Asphalt Surfaces

Sealcoating: How to Preserve Asphalt Surfaces

Sealcoating: How To Preserve Asphalt Surfaces

Have you ever started to notice your asphalt pavement fading into a gray color? That is what can happen if you do not sealcoat. Sealcoating is an important step in the pavement preservation process. This task in the process is necessary to adding on years to the life of your surfaces and can drastically improve the quality and condition of your asphalt pavement.

Seal coating is the process of adding a protective layer to your asphalt pavement. This added layer of asphalt bitumen helps to protect the surface from oils, water, and U.V. damage. By being a cost effective maintenance project, this can really help down the road.

There are several reasons for the cracks in your surfaces. One of these reasons is because of the sun. The sun’s ultraviolet rays accelerate oxidation, making the asphalt brittle. Think of when the asphalt was installed. First, it was a beautiful rich black color. Now, it is more of a gray color – that’s oxidation. The sun is “cooking” the oils out of the flexible asphalt mix, leaving it dry and brittle. Brittle asphalt can crack, allowing water to enter the paved surface. When water from snow or rain seeps through the asphalt or concrete, it can create pools of water underneath, which lead to further cracking. Sealing protects the surface from damaging elements like: car fluids such as oil, gas or antifreeze, rain, snow, ice, and UV rays.

Asphalt sealer acts as a “sunscreen” to keep the oils in the mix and slow down the damage caused by the sun. It is also a good way to restore the new black look of the original asphalt installation.

Sealcoating: How To Preserve Asphalt Surfaces

  • If you do seal, apply after the new asphalt has cured for at least 6 to 12 months. 
  • Sealer should be applied to the manufacture’s specifications – typically this will be during the summer months. 
  • All cracks should be filled with asphaltic crack filler, prior to sealing 
  • The asphalt surface should be free of vegetation and debris
  • Potholes should be fixed
  • For the best coverage, the material should be applied with a squeegee 
  • Sand should be added to the sealer for slip resistance 
  • Sealing should only be needed every 3 years 

Now that you have read about all the benefits of sealcoating, are you ready to preserve your pavement? The pavement preservation pros at Byrne & Jones Construction are ready to help! Give us a call at (314) 254-9766 

Missouri Office

Nebraska Office

Ohio Office

5730 Hayden Run Rd
Hilliard, OH 43026
(614) 662-4572
ben@byrneandjones.com

Contact Us

Information

Blog

Careers

Contact

Our Story

Services

Asphalt

Concrete

Microsurfacing

Sports Construction

Locations

Illinois

Missouri

Nebraska

Ohio

Illinois Office

2323 Kearbey Lane South
Roxana, IL 62087
(618) 221-5578
bdobbs@byrneandjones.com

Ohio Office

5730 Hayden Run Rd
Hilliard, OH 43026
(614) 662-4572
ben@byrneandjones.com

2021 Byrne & Jones Construction - Terms and Conditions - Privacy Policy