(314) 254-9766 info@byrneandjones.com
Byrne & Jones Wins American Sports Builder Association Award

Byrne & Jones Wins American Sports Builder Association Award

Multi-field complex in O’Fallon, Missouri recognized as one of nation’s best.

The American Sports Builders Association (ASBA) is recognizing the work done by Byrne & Jones Sports on behalf of the Missouri Rush Soccer Club for something that players, fans and coaches already know – their new facility in O’Fallon, Missouri is one of the best multi-field complexes in the country.

ASBA recently informed Byrne & Jones that the Missouri Rush Soccer Complex was a finalist in the Multi-Field category of its annual awards program that will take place in Scottsdale, Arizona in early December.

“A lot of hard work went into this project in a very tight time frame,” said Michael Soots, President of Missouri Rush Soccer Club.

Soots, who in addition to being President of Missouri Rush also served as the Construction Manager, praised the work ethic of Byrne & Jones. “I would definitely say the staff of Byrne & Jones exhibited a lot of the same core values as we try and emulate in our approach,” said Soots. “Jason Simpson, who was Byrne & Jones Superintendent on the project, held the entire staff to a higher standard – and it shows in the end product,” added Soots.

The complex features four, full-size soccer fields, all using the Greenfields Slidemax XP blend turf system. Byrne & Jones also self-performed the installation of concrete perimeter curbs and sidewalk, perimeter fencing and an asphalt overlay on two existing parking lots. Musco Lighting was installed by All Purpose Erectors.

The four soccer fields certainly see a lot of action. Over the past three years, Missouri Rush Soccer has grown to be one of the three largest clubs in the metro St. Louis area, working toward its mission of providing a safe and enjoyable environment for everyone to grow as players and people.

“Two years ago when we awarded Byrne & Jones the project in a very tight competition, Matt Hicks, their Director of Project Management, brought a real comfort level that proved to be the deciding difference,” said Soots. “Over the course of the project they really brought it home when it came to making you feel like family. And their understanding of working with the multiple trades around them really helped bring this project to life,” added Soots.

Now, Byrne & Jones Sports Construction is being recognized for their work by the ASBA – and soccer players from around the region are experiencing first-hand the excellence of the entire facility.

To put it simply, it’s a Rush – and that’s what soccer’s all about

Missouri Office

Nebraska Office

Ohio Office

5730 Hayden Run Rd
Hilliard, OH 43026
(614) 662-4572
ben@byrneandjones.com

Contact Us

Information

Blog

Careers

Contact

Our Story

Services

Asphalt

Concrete

Microsurfacing

Sports Construction

Locations

Illinois

Missouri

Nebraska

Ohio

Illinois Office

2323 Kearbey Lane South
Roxana, IL 62087
(618) 221-5578
bdobbs@byrneandjones.com

Ohio Office

5730 Hayden Run Rd
Hilliard, OH 43026
(614) 662-4572
ben@byrneandjones.com

2021 Byrne & Jones Construction - Terms and Conditions - Privacy Policy

What is the best track surface for High Schools?

What is the best track surface for High Schools?

What is the best track surface for high schools?

So it’s time to choose a track surface – which route should you go? The good news is there are only a handful of standard track surfacing systems offered, and only two that are standard for high schools: Polyurethane Black Mat and Structural Spray systems, and then Latex Systems. Then, the two most important factors that come into play when deciding on one of these track surfaces are durability and cost.

Historically, latex systems were a common first-step when schools were moving from a cinder or gravel track to an all-weather track due to Latex’s slightly lower initial installation cost (compared to polyurethane). In recent years, a higher percentage of schools are installing polyurethane as their first system, or removing their existing latex systems to install a polyurethane system. This shift is due to less frequently-needed resurfacings and the longer total life of the polyurethane system.

Latex Running Track Systems

Latex tracks are installed by broadcasting rubber onto the asphalt base, and then coating it with a liquid latex binder. This is performed in multiple lifts and most latex tracks will have two to eight lifts. Naturally, an eight-lift system will last you much longer between resurfacings than a two-lift system, and the frequency of resurfacing can be simply calculated by: number of lifts = number of years between resurfacings. A two-lift latex system should have another top layer installed after two years, and an eight-lift system should have a new top coat put on after eight years. Many latex systems are sold as 7 to 10-year systems regardless of how many lifts are being installed. Make sure you speak with your track provider and are aware of how many lifts are being installed prior to signing on the dotted line.

The most common issue with latex systems is that no matter how many lifts are initially installed, the top layer will shed and harden due to use and UV damage from the sun. As the sun hardens the top layer, and athletes and walkers use the track, the top layer begins to shear off. If you have seen a track like (picture of a worn latex track), then you can be certain that the owner of that track was not able to or did not properly follow resurfacing guidelines. Even if the track surfacing may not be fully worn into the asphalt, the top layer hardens with age and becomes harsher on the athlete’s muscles and joints.

Polyurethane Base Mat and Structural Spray Systems (BM&SS)

Most high schools today are installing a Base Mat and Structural Spray (BM&SS) Polyurethane System. There are higher-level, more expensive polyurethane systems that can commonly be found at the collegiate level, but if you are looking for high-quality that won’t break the bank, the BM&SS hits the sweet spot.

Unlike Latex systems that are installed in lifts of rubber-binder-rubber-binder, BM&SS systems mix the rubber and polyurethane prior to installation onto the track asphalt. This allows for a more durable bond and longer-lasting surface.

The base mat is installed with a paver similar to an asphalt paver – but this paver was built specifically for running tracks. A black base mat alone without a structural spray would wear like a mid-range latex track. What makes these systems stand well above their counterpart is the structural spray component.

The Structural Spray is composed of a finer rubber than is in the black base mat, and much higher percentage of liquid polyurethane. The spray is installed with two passes – once clockwise around the track, and the other counter-clockwise (along with once in each direction for field event runways). The purpose of this spray is to protect the black base mat, which is the true cushion and performance layer of the track. A latex system has no top protection, so as it wears, the system begins to oxidize, thin out and harden. The structural spray on a poly system acts like a sunscreen protecting the black mat from the UV degradation of the sun allowing and maintaining the integrity of your black base mat for the life of your track.

The Structural Spray brings three main benefits to the system above the standard latex systems:

1) UV Protection – By providing a UV-protected layer over the base mat, the sun cannot damage the base mat.

2) Use Protection – As athletes and the community uses the running track, the spray will slowly wear over time while maintaining the integrity of the black base mat. Your black base mat will not lose thickness, over time, if new structural sprays are applied accordingly (Appx. every 8 years)

3) Durability – Due to the finer rubber and higher liquid content, the spray seeps into the top layer of the base mat and “locks” the system together. This helps prevent against the cracking commonly seem in latex tracks.

If you have a running track that is in need of attention, or simply have questions regarding the types of track systems that are out there, please do not hesitate to call us at (314) 254-9766.

Missouri Office

Nebraska Office

Ohio Office

5730 Hayden Run Rd
Hilliard, OH 43026
(614) 662-4572
ben@byrneandjones.com

Contact Us

Information

Blog

Careers

Contact

Our Story

Services

Asphalt

Concrete

Microsurfacing

Sports Construction

Locations

Illinois

Missouri

Nebraska

Ohio

Illinois Office

2323 Kearbey Lane South
Roxana, IL 62087
(618) 221-5578
bdobbs@byrneandjones.com

Ohio Office

5730 Hayden Run Rd
Hilliard, OH 43026
(614) 662-4572
ben@byrneandjones.com

2021 Byrne & Jones Construction - Terms and Conditions - Privacy Policy

What Are The Types of Infill That Go Into an Artificial Turf Field?

What Are The Types of Infill That Go Into an Artificial Turf Field?

What are the types of infill that go into an artificial turf field?

The infill is the equivalent to the earth of a natural grass playing surface. The goal is to have the infill feel and perform like the “earth” of a natural grass field. The infill will determine how firm or fast a field plays, how the ball bounces and rolls, and it impacts how safe the fields are. The amount of infill needed is determined by how tall the fibers are, whether or not there is a shock pad being used, and the sport being played.

Infills typically fall into 5 categories. Each of these infills vary greatly, in both performance and cost.

  • Coated Sands
  • Coated SBR Rubber
  • Thermo Plastic Elastomers (TPE)
  • Virgin EPDM Rubber
  • Organic Infill

Understanding the different types of infill

The infill system is one of the most important aspects of all synthetic turf fields. It is the basis for the safety of the turf system by providing the appropriate cushioning to absorb impact. The infill provides the foundation to a field’s performance level by offering traction for players to cut, plant and release just like they would on natural grass.

Coated Sandsare made from uniformly sized natural sand and typically coated with acrylic, polyefin or an elastic coating.   These systems are usually a full depth infill system – not mixed with other mediums.  This infill does not require an irrigation system.  Shock pads are HIGHLY recommended if you are using a coated sand infill system. Most manufacturers require a shock pad, when using this infill.  Coated sand is subject to similar quality issues as TPE and as EPDM.  All three may clump over time.  Coated sand can add approximately $150,000 to $200,000 per field (this would include the cost of the shock pad.)  Coated sands are typically much cooler to the touch then SBR basic rubber system.  The maintenance of coated sand is similar to SBR systems; with a top dressing recommended in year five (5). 

Coated SBR Rubber – is very similar to the traditional SBR rubber infill. The SBR rubber product is typically coated with a virgin EPDM rubber. This system does not require an irrigation system. A shock pad is not required. However, if you are trying to pass a HIC Test a shock absorbing pad would be needed. Coated SBR can add approximately $40,000 per field. These infill systems are easy to maintain. The field will need to be top dressed every 5 years- at a cost of approximately $15,000.

Thermo Plastic Elastomers – (TPE) is similar in size to SBR rubber, but it is harder and typically rounder.  Thermo Plastic Elastomers are usually mixed with standard synthetic turf sands – to make up the infill system.  TPE comes in many colors and many variations for the aesthetics of a synthetic turf application.  Since TPE is a plastic, there is a risk over time of the TPE “melting” together.  This system does not require an irrigation system but will most likely require a shock pad. Some TPE manufactures claim their product can result in a 10 percent drop in temperature when used as an infill for artificial turf.  Maintenance of this system is very similar to the SBR systemsa top dressing is recommended every 5 years.

Virgin EPDM Rubberis rubber that has not been recycled. It is similar in size to SBR rubber. This is the most common infill system that is used in the artificial turf industry. Rubber is mixed with standard synthetic turf sands.  EPDM comes in many colors and many variations for the aesthetics of a synthetic turf application.  This system does not require an irrigation system A shock absorbing pad is recommended. Maintenance of this system is very similar to the SBR systems with a top dressing recommended after 5 years of play.

Organic InfillMost organic infill options are made from cork, walnut shells, coconut fiber, wood and or other similar products. 

Organic infills help produce the feel of natural grass, under foot. They make the fields play and perform more like natural grass too.  Because organic infills don’t conduct heat like the other infill systems, they are great at reducing field temperatures. Some organic infill systems claim they can reduce field temperatures up to 50-degrees.  

Most organic infilled systems will require an irrigation system. Water is necessary to keep the infill “hydrated”. This also assists with the temperature reduction.  Since most of the systems need water, as part of the recipe, the fields can be subject to freezing in the winter months.   

Because organic infills are very light weight, “floating” may occur. This can happen whenever there are heavy amounts of rain, in a short period of time, the infill will “float” or migriate to the sidelines. Shock pads are required when using organic infilled systems.  

This type of infill system can ad$120,000 to $400,000 to your project – depending on the infill, irrigation, and the shock pad selected.  

 

Missouri Office

Nebraska Office

Ohio Office

5730 Hayden Run Rd
Hilliard, OH 43026
(614) 662-4572
ben@byrneandjones.com

Contact Us

Information

Blog

Careers

Contact

Our Story

Services

Asphalt

Concrete

Microsurfacing

Sports Construction

Locations

Illinois

Missouri

Nebraska

Ohio

Illinois Office

2323 Kearbey Lane South
Roxana, IL 62087
(618) 221-5578
bdobbs@byrneandjones.com

Ohio Office

5730 Hayden Run Rd
Hilliard, OH 43026
(614) 662-4572
ben@byrneandjones.com

2021 Byrne & Jones Construction - Terms and Conditions - Privacy Policy

What are the different types of Tennis & Pickleball Court playing surfaces?

What are the different types of Tennis & Pickleball Court playing surfaces?

What are the different types of Tennis & Pickleball court surfaces?

Tennis is played on a variety of surfaces and each surface has its own characteristics which affect the playing style of the game. There are four main types of courts depending on the materials used for the court surface: clay courts, hard courts, grass courts and carpet courts

Clay Courts

Clay courts, which are made of crushed shale, stone or brick, slow down the ball and produce a high bounce in comparison to grass or hard courts. For this reason, the clay court takes away many of the advantages of big serves, which makes it hard for serve-based players to dominate on the surface. Clay courts are cheaper to construct than other types of tennis courts, but a clay surface costs more to maintain. Clay courts need to be rolled to preserve flatness. The clay’s water content must be balanced; green clay courts generally require the courts to be sloped to allow water run-off. 

Hard Courts

Hard courts are made of uniform rigid material, often covered with an acrylic surface layer to offer greater consistency of bounce than other outdoor surfaces. Hard courts can vary in speed, though they are faster than clay but not as fast as grass courts. The quantity of sand added to the paint can greatly affect the rate at which the ball slows down.  

Grass Courts

Grass courts are the fastest type of courts in common use. They consist of grass grown on very hard-packed soil, which adds additional variables: bounces depend on how healthy the grass is, how recently it has been mowed, and the wear and tear of recent play.  

Grass courts were once among the most common tennis surfaces, but are now rare due to high maintenance costs as they must be watered and mown often, and take a longer time to dry after rain than hard courts. 

Carpet Courts

Carpeted courts are a short piled form of artificial turf infilled with sand. Carpet is generally a fast surface, faster than hardcourt, with low bounce. Some carpet courts are installed over hard surface courts that are in need of maintenance or repair. 

Missouri Office

Nebraska Office

Ohio Office

5730 Hayden Run Rd
Hilliard, OH 43026
(614) 662-4572
ben@byrneandjones.com

Contact Us

Information

Blog

Careers

Contact

Our Story

Services

Asphalt

Concrete

Microsurfacing

Sports Construction

Locations

Illinois

Missouri

Nebraska

Ohio

Illinois Office

2323 Kearbey Lane South
Roxana, IL 62087
(618) 221-5578
bdobbs@byrneandjones.com

Ohio Office

5730 Hayden Run Rd
Hilliard, OH 43026
(614) 662-4572
ben@byrneandjones.com

2021 Byrne & Jones Construction - Terms and Conditions - Privacy Policy

Are Artificial Turf Fields Safe?

Are Artificial Turf Fields Safe?

Are Artificial Turf Fields Safe?

The short answer is yes! Artificial turf fields are safe, provided they are constructed correctly and properly maintained.

Let us backup for a moment…natural grass fields will always be the preferred playing surface, provided they are well maintained and in good shape. The major knock against natural grass fields is they cannot take the wear and tear after hours of play. In addition, in certain climates, the soil can become very compacted and hard – think very hot dry summers or very cold winters. Ultimately, natural grass is very difficult to maintain the level of consistency, playability, and safety. That is why artificial surfaces have become so popular…they are more predictable and consistent in their performance and safety.

So, the question becomes how do you build a safe field? First, you must select a turf system from a certified manufacture who spends the time, effort, and energy to invest in studying player safety – and how their turf systems perform. The goal is to mimic natural grass.

Each manufacture’s system will have recommended amounts of infill that act as a cushion for the athlete’s head and body to protect them from the stone beneath the turf. Typically, this consists of sand and crumb rubber in varying amounts, measured in pounds per square foot (1×1) area. There are tests designed to measure the amount of “cushion” that is provided by the infill called GMAX and HIC test. (More on GMAX and HIC later.)

With the industry’s desire to make infills that do not retain as much heat, they have come up with alternate infills that eliminate the heat absorption of crumb rubber. When the rubber is eliminated from the field so is the “cushion” part that protects the athlete from concussions. To compensate from the rubber being removed, the industry has engineered shock pads (think carpet pad) that is placed on top of the stone, and beneath the turf. This provides for consistent fall protection and allows owners to choose organic infills which reduce the amount of heat that rubber generally holds or tuning the infill to the performance of the sports being played on the surface.

The importance of shock pads cannot be overlooked. Although crumb rubber is effective at cushioning falls it is not ideal, because crumb rubber moves.The rubber can migrate from the center of the field to the sidelines. (That is why a consistent maintenance plan is so important. Rubber needs to be added and redistributed to keep the field at a steady and consistent GMAX rating.)

Because shock pads do not move or migrate (they are flat polypropylene panels that blanket the stone) they are predictable, so GMAX is 100% consistent and guaranteed on every area of the field for multiple field life cycles.

The other component of player safety is lower extremity injuries. These typically come from “soft” fields or from fields where the player’s cleats do not properly release when they plant their foot. Shock pads allow the manufacture to increase the sand content, which is essential for footing and ballast for turf stability, which firms up the playing surface. By adding more sand, these fields tend to perform more like natural grass, reduce muscle fatigue and allow for better turf cleat interaction.

It is important to research, ask questions, request the safety data, and evaluate what level of safety and maintenance you are willing to take on. You can build a safe high-performance surface if you choose correctly.

Missouri Office

Nebraska Office

Ohio Office

5730 Hayden Run Rd
Hilliard, OH 43026
(614) 662-4572
ben@byrneandjones.com

Contact Us

Information

Blog

Careers

Contact

Our Story

Services

Asphalt

Concrete

Microsurfacing

Sports Construction

Locations

Illinois

Missouri

Nebraska

Ohio

Illinois Office

2323 Kearbey Lane South
Roxana, IL 62087
(618) 221-5578
bdobbs@byrneandjones.com

Ohio Office

5730 Hayden Run Rd
Hilliard, OH 43026
(614) 662-4572
ben@byrneandjones.com

2021 Byrne & Jones Construction - Terms and Conditions - Privacy Policy

Is All Synthetic Turf the Same?

Is All Synthetic Turf the Same?

Is all synthetic turf the same?

The Sports Industry is a complex and confusing playing field that is constantly innovating, consolidating, and improving. New fibers are being introduced, new backings are being created, new infills are coming to the market and new safety data is being released, daily.

Like most things manufactured there are varying degrees of quality. To the eye, all turf may look the same, but they are drastically different. You can purchase a quality branded product where the product has been tested and designed for optimal performance, wear, and player safety; or you can purchase a flimsy fiber with poor backings that may look good for a few years, then fall apart. Doing a deep dive into the science, safety and performance can save you thousands of dollars down the road.

To select the best field for your needs it is important to understand what your goals are…do you want the safest field, the most durable field, the least expensive field, the field that is designed to play and perform most like natural grass, or the field that is designed the best for the sport(s) being played?

Once these questions have been answered, the next step is to determine what sports are being played. That answer will help determine the fiber type (Slit-film, Monofilament, or a combination of the two fibers and the fiber height). Those two things will greatly impact the ball roll, cleat interaction, durability, player safety, and longevity. For example, a football-specific turf will be quite a bit different than a baseball turf. A field hockey surface will be different than a Lacrosse field. A soccer field will be different than a football field. The fiber needs to be matched to the sport – and your goals.

In addition to the fiber type and its height, the amount of fiber in the field needs to be taken into consideration. Is a 32-ounce field better than a 64-ounce field? That depends on the system and sports being played. Just because a field has more fiber, does not mean it is a better field. Fiber type and fiber weight will impact the performance of the surface. Testing is done to determine how tall the fibers need to be (1-inch to 2.5-inches) how much infill is needed, how much fiber spacing between rows is needed, and how many total fibers are needed for that system. The fiber amount in the system can also vary due to the chemical ingredients included to make the yarn. Most fibers look the same, but it is the chemical ingredients that make the fiber last longer. (Think about plastic water bottles…there are some that are very soft and flimsy and others that are thicker and stiff. The same principles apply to making turf fibers. You can make weak, flimsy fibers, or beefy hardy ones.)

Other things that separate turf manufacture’s field quality and longevity are the backings and coating that are being used. How many backings are used in the making of the turf? What type of coating do they use? If they use multiple backings how are they joined together? How do they deal with dimensional stability? Are the fibers tufted or woven? What chemical product do they use to secure the fibers to the backing? If your fibers fall out…that’s not good!

Infill type and maintenance will have a significant impact on the performance, playability, safety, and longevity of the field you select. As will a shock pad. Each manufacture will have different recommendations based on their tested systems.

If you are working with nationally branded turf manufactures who value science, performance, and safety vs. those who push out low-quality generic fields you are better off. They are spending money on research, development, and player safety to protect their brands.

NOT all artificial turf fields are the same…in fact, they are very different. It is important to do your research and learn as much as you can about each system, before making an investment in synthetic/artificial turf.

Remember…The turf you select is only as good as the foundation that it is built upon. Always start with a good base then work up.

Missouri Office

Nebraska Office

Ohio Office

5730 Hayden Run Rd
Hilliard, OH 43026
(614) 662-4572
ben@byrneandjones.com

Contact Us

Information

Blog

Careers

Contact

Our Story

Services

Asphalt

Concrete

Microsurfacing

Sports Construction

Locations

Illinois

Missouri

Nebraska

Ohio

Illinois Office

2323 Kearbey Lane South
Roxana, IL 62087
(618) 221-5578
bdobbs@byrneandjones.com

Ohio Office

5730 Hayden Run Rd
Hilliard, OH 43026
(614) 662-4572
ben@byrneandjones.com

2021 Byrne & Jones Construction - Terms and Conditions - Privacy Policy